phil21 comments on “California bullet train cost surges by $2.8B”

phil21 comments on “California bullet train cost surges by $2.8B”


2:40 minute head time at your departure city? No way.

I typically show up roughly 60-45 minutes prior to flight time, so 15-30 minutes before boarding. By the time I get through security the plane is typically just starting to board and I walk right on.

I have gotten my door to door times between MSP and ORD to just over (sometimes under if I get lucky on train to city) 3 hours including a 20 minute Uber on one end and a 40 minute train ride into the city on the other. Pretty similar distances involved.

> going through onerous security

I imagine that in the US, this will be much the same. Or will be the moment after the first attack on a train. I don’t see any long-term security gains here, the US is simply not Europe.


link

By:phil21
Source:https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=16174181

withdavidli comments on “Bitcoin’s energy usage is huge – we can’t afford to ignore it”

withdavidli comments on “Bitcoin’s energy usage is huge – we can’t afford to ignore it”


Fair point. All I was trying to show was that currencies like the Euro or USD has greater than zero energy usage to create/distribute.

I don’t think BTC will stay the top crypto if it cannot resolve its current issues (though new ones will come after). Articles like takes stance, whether they know it or not, of this is here to stay for a long time and we need to deal with the ramifications. If that is true, more people are going to work on solving this issue either through energy regulation, better hardware, better renewable energy, mass adoption of different coins, or moving to POS (or anything other proof system) instead of POW.


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By:withdavidli
Source:https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=16174180

rizzom5000 comments on “Apple plans new U.S. campus, to pay $38B in foreign cash taxes”

rizzom5000 comments on “Apple plans new U.S. campus, to pay $38B in foreign cash taxes”


I don’t think it is. If the > workers DOING THE ACTUAL WORK are able to provide more value than the corporation, then why are they working for the corporation instead of providing more value than the corporation by themselves; and paying themselves more than the corporation pays them? I think OP’s argument could be an example of reductio ad absurdum.


link

By:rizzom5000
Source:https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=16174179

vatotemking comments on “How a 22-Year-Old Discovered Meltdown and Spectre”

vatotemking comments on “How a 22-Year-Old Discovered Meltdown and Spectre”


In typical hackernews fashion, most of the comment (even the top comment) is someone downplaying someone else’s brilliance.

Why cant you just be happy for the kid?

Some people are just plain better than you. And its OKAY. Most of us here are average, and will probably never see our own success story published like this. Kid has done and contributed so much at a young age. His skills has benefited us all. Lets just be happy for him.


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By:vatotemking
Source:https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=16174178

bm1362 comments on “The Woman Behind Two Men and a Truck”

bm1362 comments on “The Woman Behind Two Men and a Truck”


I hired these guys and they never showed. I was in contact with them every hour, being reassured they were just running late. Eventually they stopped responding.

By midnight I gave up and threw half my stuff on the curb and UberXL’ed my clothes and small items to my new apartment.

Unfortunately I had a flight at 3am so couldn’t handle a cancelation, which is my fault.


link

By:bm1362
Source:https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=16174011

vidarh comments on “Some thoughts on security after ten years of Qmail 1.0″

vidarh comments on “Some thoughts on security after ten years of Qmail 1.0″


I have an ancient “backup” sitting somewhere. It was a provider called Nameplanet which provided vanity addresses (lastname.[assorted TLDs] for example), and morphed into Global Name Registry when we launched the .name TLD… The webmail system itself was sold to NetIdentity in 2001 or 2002…

It had a few interesting details – we ran it on ReiserFS for the fast/efficient small file support (at the time it really stood out) which made it great for Maildir’s.

We also eventually used a small daemon to poll backends for which server a user belonged to, which had a mechanism to let us mark a user as “busy” so that we could balance accounts between backends by marking it as “busy” on both servers, sync the files over, and then mark it as available again without triggering errors anywhere. qmail on our MX’s was modified to look up the right server that way.

The biggest changes were the POP modifications I mentioned. The ones I remember off the top of my head were:

* We modified qmail-local and the pop server to append size changes (from writing a new message or deleting one) to a file used to manage quotas. We appended rather than rewrite because it reduced the need for file locking (we took care to do single writes). We’d lock and coalesce the changes when the file got over a certain size.

* qmail-local was also changed to append the message size, and read-status to the filename. That let us avoid stat() calls for the files for the filesize, and opening and reading the files for unread counts etc. It was one of the first optimizations we did.

* Then we added a cache file that contained subject, sender, size, attachment status etc., for the web frontend, which would be dynamically re-generated automatically as needed.

* We made “+[something]” sort directly into folder “something”.

* When we sold it I was most of the way through adding Sieve support to our qmail-local replacement.

These changes were quite small, and each successive changes lowered IO load dramatically (we handled about 2 million accounts before it was sold). Today, we could probably handle the IO load and storage we had with a single NVMe card…

The web frontend would try to use our extended POP3 command, and then fall back to scan the messages (and store a cache locally on the frontend) if it wasn’t available, so we could use it as a POP3 client for other backends too. (The frontend is a story in itself – C++ CGI statically linked to shorted load time (it made a big difference at the time) and with “delete” only for really large allocations, to avoid wasting time on deallocation since we knew each process would at most live for a few seconds.


link

By:vidarh
Source:https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=16174018